How productive a researcher do you have to be to be competitive for a TT ecology faculty position in the US or Canada? Here are the data.

The faculty job market is going to be really bad this year due to the fallout from Covid-19. My heart goes out to anyone on the job market this year. But still, there are some jobs out there, and so I’m sure folks on the ecology faculty job market would like good information about the market. I spent three years compiling a lot of data on the US and Canadian ecology faculty job market, summarized and linked to here. But few folks seem to click those links. So over the next few days I’m going to re-post some of the links that remain relevant and useful.

Today, data on how productive a researcher do you have to be to be competitive for a tenure-track faculty position at a big US or Canadian research university? What about for a less research-intensive position? Here are the answers, for various crude quantitative measures of research productivity: number of first authored papers (in all journals, and in leading journals), number of Nature/Science/PNAS papers, and Google Scholar h-index. The tl;dr version is that, according to these admittedly very crude measures, you don’t have to be nearly as productive as most people think to be competitive for a TT ecology faculty position at a research university. Research productivity varies hugely among recent TT hires, even among new hires into the same department.

If you’re on the ecology faculty job market, I hope you found this post useful context. Good luck, I hope things work out for you.

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