Are there any measurable predictors of how many interviews or offers an ecology faculty job seeker will receive in the US or Canada?

The faculty job market is going to be really bad this year due to the fallout from Covid-19. My heart goes out to anyone on the market this year. But still, there are some jobs out there, and so I’m sure folks on the ecology faculty job market would like good information about the market. I spent three years compiling a lot of data on the US and Canadian ecology faculty job market, summarized and linked to here. But few folks seem to click those links. So over the next few days I’m going to re-post some of the links that remain relevant and useful.

Today: as an ecology faculty job seeker in the US or Canada, is there any way to estimate how “competitive” you’ll be? That is, is there any way to predict how many interviews or offers you’ll receive? Turns out that most of the predictors on which people focus–number of publications, number of courses taught, years of postdoctoral experience, etc.–are useless. There are only a couple of measurable predictors that have a bit of predictive power: number of applications you submit, and…one other one that I’m going to make you click through to discover. If you click that last link, please be aware that it’s a long nuanced post that resists easy summary. You really ought to read the whole thing carefully if you’re going to read it at all.

Before anyone asks, no, I don’t think the comparative lack of faculty jobs this year will cause this year to deviate from the recent years with respect to the questions addressed in the linked posts.

If you are on the ecology faculty job market this year, I hope you find the linked posts useful. Best of luck in your search.

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