Friday links: modeling the light at the end of the tunnel, and more (UPDATED)

Also this week: promoting replicable ecological research, the most important statistical ideas of the last 50 years, and more.

From Jeremy:

Youyang Gu’s forecast for the end of the US coronavirus pandemic.

Science with a news article on the founding of a new scholarly society to promote replicable ecological research. Here’s a recent guest post from society co-founder Tim Parker on the lessons ecologists should take from the replication crisis in psychology. And if you read the linked news article and now want to hear more from Elizabeth Borer on how distributed experiments can improve ecological research, here you go. (UPDATE: and see the comments, where Tim Parker notes that he’s quoted out of context in the linked news article, and clarifies his views on replicability in ecology.)

Andrew Gelman’s list of the most important statistical ideas of the last 50 years.

An argument that US public health experts got the messaging on masks very wrong back in the spring, and that they continue to muddle messaging on ventilation.

3 thoughts on “Friday links: modeling the light at the end of the tunnel, and more (UPDATED)

  1. Thanks Jeremy for calling attention to the news article in Science. As I wrote on Twitter right after the story was posted earlier this week, I am quoted out of context in that article. The article implies that I think that the ecology literature in general is a “house of cards” and that the discipline is experiencing an existential crisis. I do NOT believe this, although I do expect that some areas of this literature are less robust than others, and I do think we should be working to improve how we do some things in ecology and evolutionary biology.

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